Tag Archives: Princess Lilian

The Future of Sweden’s Monarchy

In Sweden on October 6th, a  motion was filed with Parliament calling for the abolishment of the monarchy.   While these motions are certainly not new, the latest is significant in that for the first time in modern history, a joint motion across party lines was filed.

The justification for the motion stated in part that, “We in Sweden have long fought for equality and it has created a society in which success is based on the individual merits rather than on the privileges and kinship… The monarchy is incompatible with democracy, equality and civil rights. We believe that the right to represent Sweden not to be inherited. It can only be given through democratic processes…”

Monarchies in today’s society are like park statues, they are reminders of historical figures, serve no real practical purpose beyond the decorative, some people enjoy them, some people think they’re a waste of money, some don’t even notice them but they tend to get crapped on a lot.

It’s always struck me as odd that Sweden still has a monarchy, as a society Sweden is evolved in ways I greatly admire but still maintains its rich cultural charm.

As Sweden’s official website notes, “Staunchly opposed to privilege, Sweden has always sought to avoid ranking people which is why beauty contests and ‘homecoming queen’ events are rare.”  No homecoming queens, but taxpayers are still expected to fund the privileged existences of actual kings and queens?  The member of the Swedish Royal Family who best represents Sweden’s societal beliefs is British American Chris O’Neill who refused a title.

The king is a ceremonial figure but he does still have influence and the power of course to get millions from Swedish citizens for the weddings of two of his children who aren’t in the direct line of succession, cost he could easily cover from his own personal fortune, estimated to be around the $50 million mark.  As a representative of Sweden, King Carl Gustaf’s views on women are unsettling.  He objected to changing the rules of succession to absolute primogeniture in 1980, stating, “I would prefer that my son Carl Philip be my successor, and I’m sure the majority of the Swedish people would prefer to have a king on the throne.”  And in 2003 when asked if he still thought the succession change was wrong, he responded, “Of course.”    But the reason offered in 2003 had to do with the succession change being retroactive, his son was seven months old when the throne went back to his first born, Victoria.  The statement still raised enough eyebrows that the following day the court had to release a statement that the king thinks Crown Princess Victoria is doing a fine job.  Commenting on the king’s sex scandal, Katrine Kielos noted in an Aftonbladet article, “Women were simply desserts, used as sweets to be served with the coffee.”  When all three of his children married, the bride was given away by her father, a sexist tradition not observed in Sweden because it represents a property exchange.  One of the latest additions to the Swedish Royal Family is the anti-feminism figure Miss Slitz 2004 whose work history promotes a view of women as sex objects elevated to the status Her Royal Highness Princess Sofia.  Members of the Royal Family are official representatives of Sweden and yet nothing about the Swedish monarchy reflects the egalitarian beliefs and progressive views of Sweden.

As noted on the website for  The Swedish Republican Association, the monarch’s powers extend being duties as head of state outlined in the 1974 Instrument of Government. “By making statements in political questions he or she influences the debate through his or her unique position without having to take political responsibility. Due to the massive medial attention they receive, the royal family has a decisive influence on the public opinion.”  Some of Sweden’s citizens are afraid to openly criticize the Royal Family, believing harm will come to them or their families.  In a 2010 Svenskdam article on Carl Philip’s relationship with Sofia Hellqvist, one commenter responded to another’s urging that Svenskdam readers complain to the Court about Sofia’s unsuitability with the comment:

SvenskdamComment

Similar fears have been expressed to me by Swedish citizens, who are also frustrated by the influence the Swedish Royal Family seems to have over the media.

I’m beginning to understand why some people feel paranoid about criticizing members of the Swedish Royal Family.  While working on this post, my apartment was buzzed by a man in a baseball cap standing with his back to the door so I couldn’t see his face and shortly after when I got thrown off my Wi-Fi, this came up under diagnostics where I expected to see my own network:

NetworkDiagnostics

Likely an eery coincidence, but my mind began to wonder if Sofia is aware of my blog and has figured out the identity of the anonymous source to which I’ve eluded in some posts.  Although, really, due to Sofia’s lack of discretion, there’s little I could add about her character that wasn’t summed up in this Svenskdam comment five years ago:

FakeSnakeComment

For clarification, the above point was about understanding paranoia which by definition is an irrational belief caused by anxiety or fear.   When a king causes anxiety or fear by virtue of the shady characters he has consorted with as revealed by his sex scandal, his effectiveness as a country’s representative is compromised.  A formal investigation was never made into the strip club visits and blackmail photos because the monarch is immune from criminal charges.  As Sven Erik Osterberg, a member of Parliament and the constitutional oversight committee noted, “The only person who can look into this is the monarch himself, [he] who wishes it to blow over.”  While considered a ceremonial figure, the monarch has absolute immunity from criminal charges and cannot be prosecuted or held accountable for his or her actions in judicial proceedings.  It’s not difficult to understand why some  Swedish citizens have expressed fear of someone who has had dealings with criminals and cannot be charged with a crime.

Supposedly King Carl Gustaf believes the monarchy is nearing its end.  Were it not for the popularity of Crown Princess Victoria, likely the end would come sooner than later.  I believe Victoria will likely be Queen, but only if she ascends the throne in the next decade and only if reforms are made.

As the motion filed with Parliament indicated, “The current form of government are over 40 years old and was in his time a political steps that deepened democracy by limiting the monarch’s power. The Democratic reforms must continue, and in this direction is the abolition of the pre-democratic system that monarchy is an expression. It is high time to look again the monarchy’s role in modern Swedish society.”

The monarchies of Europe are looking for ways to evolve for the sake of self-preservation.  Prince Charles envisions a streamlined monarchy when he becomes king while newly kinged Felipe promised financial transparency and the opening up of the palace’s accounts following  his father’s  abdication.  While reports in the last few years have listed the Dutch Royal Family as the most expensive to taxpayers, no one really knows how much each monarchy costs to run because of costs that are hidden from the public.  With an estimated additional undisclosed $300 million in security, the British Royal Family likely is the most costly while Spain’s monarchy is probably the least expensive.  But no one really knows which is pretty astounding in modern times that the taxpayers have provided these hereditary institutions with blank checks.  Recently an extra $1 million was granted to King Carl Gustaf for “security”.  Likely the increase was for protection officers for its latest princess, Sofia, although it could be for new security cameras or it could be for a different kind of security for a king whose past scandals have required the purchasing of incriminating photos.

If Sweden’s monarchy is continue, it should follow the streamlining trend of limiting the Royal Family to current king/queen, heir and heir’s children and Spain’s lead with its operating costs.   According to the Swedish Monarchy’s royal finances page which lists 2013’s numbers, included in the budget for the Court Administration was Princess Lilian’s Household.  While Princess Lilian who passed away in March 2013 was obviously a beloved member of the Swedish Royal Family (she was the wife of the king’s uncle), I don’t understand why she continued to have a household staff covered under the appanage since it was announced in 2010 that sadly due to Alzheimer’s, she would no longer be able to make public appearances.  She was no longer undertaking royal duties so shouldn’t any expenses related to her care been covered out of her family’s personal finances?  Additionally, on the Royal Finances page, it lists budget and staff in terms of “approximately”.  When it comes to taxpayer money, shouldn’t there be complete transparency?

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Swedish Tiara Possibilities

Royal weddings, like the upcoming one in Sweden, are like the Super Bowl of shiny things.  Even if you aren’t a fan of either team, you still watch for a love of the game.

Royal tiaras, occupying their perch above a glittering and gilded visual feast, are usually masterpieces of jeweled artistry.  As soon as royal engagements are announced, speculation begins about which tiara the bride will wear down the aisle.

Historically, most brides marrying into royal families wore tiaras from their own families on their wedding day, the tiara represented the bride’s past and the family from which she came.  Now that restrictions have lifted and royals are no longer required to select a spouse who comes from the sort of family that has their own tiaras, royal families are left in a bit of a tiara quandary.  Most tiaras owned by royal families are steeped in history and quite valuable so now that the mere mention of royal divorce doesn’t require smelling salts, royal families are understandably more reluctant to give one of the family’s tiaras to the bride as a wedding gift, opting instead to simply loan the bride a tiara, purchase her a new one or acquire an older one at auction. Mary wore a brand new tiara when she said her I Dos to Crown Prince Frederick, as did Sarah Ferguson when she became the Duchess of York, while Sarah’s one-time sister-in-law Sophie received a new rather disjointed-looking tiara made from old pieces.  When Mette-Marit married Crown Prince Haakon, a tiara from 1910 was purchased at auction, perhaps unknown to the family at the time, it’s the same one worn by Cate Blanchett in An Ideal Husband.  Both Maxima and Letizia got loaners while Charlene went a tiara-less route, opting for a jeweled piece in her hair when she wed Prince Albert.

It’s been speculated the Prince Carl Philip was designing a tiara for his soon-to-be bride Sofia Hellqvist and that would probably be the best scenario given the pre-wedding debate over Sofia becoming a princess, supporters would see it as a nice personalized element while more traditional royal watchers would find it more appropriate than Sofia wearing a historically significant piece.  Additionally, while the Swedish Royal Family has some truly spectacular and some truly unfortunate tiaras, not all of them are for general use and most wouldn’t really work as a bridal tiara.

A new tiara is extremely costly and with a few possible exceptions, they pale in comparison to those made prior to the beginning of the 20th century.  Given how relatively modest Sofia’s engagement ring is, it’s very possible Sofia will wind up being loaned a tiara from the Bernadotte Family Foundation.  Having a foundation like the one employed by the Swedish Royal Family for their jewels is quite brilliant, the shared set-up allows for a larger selection of jewels available to family members while having them belong to a collective whole instead of individuals ensures they won’t ever leave the family or be sold.

Several smaller tiaras have been sold at auction this past year and it’s possible one of them was purchased for Sofia as a wedding and starter tiara.  Out of what I’ve seen, though, none have struck me as a great first all-around tiara for Sofia.  Despite the critical opinions I hold of the bride, I begrudge no one a great tiara.  I’m not sure the king and queen share my beliefs about the inalienable right of quality sparkle, though.

Both Princess Madeleine and Crown Princess Victoria received a tiara on their 18th birthdays, as is Swedish Royal Family tradition.  Starter tiaras are usually smaller because tiara wearing can take some adjustment.  Tiaras are often difficult to anchor in hair, many can wobble depending how they are attached, a quick turn of the head can cause one to fall with often disastrous results, some can cause headaches… tiara wearing isn’t for sissies.  Consequently brides who aren’t used to tiaras can have some difficulty so their bridal tiaras tend to be small as well.  When Kate Middleton married Prince William, the Halo Scroll Tiara was sewn into her hair to ensure it wouldn’t fall off.

It’s highly unlikely Sofia would wear Princess Madeleine’s and Crown Princess Victoria’s starter tiaras because they belong to the princesses and aren’t shared as part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation.

Princess Madeleine, Aquamarine Bandeau

Princess Madeleine, Aquamarine Bandeau

Princess Madeleine’s tiara, the Aquamarine Bandeau, is most commonly referred to as the Cyclops Tiara.

This style tends to look better worn further down as was the style in the 1920s, but in this case, not so much.

Princess Madeleine, Cyclops Tiara

Princess Madeleine, Cyclops Tiara

When someone as beautiful as Princess Madeleine makes a bandeau look like a band-no, it’s time to repurpose the stone.

Aquamarine Bandeau, a.k.a. The Cyclops Princess Madeleine's 18th Birthday Tiara Verdict: A giant no

Aquamarine Bandeau, a.k.a. The Cyclops
Princess Madeleine’s 18th Birthday Tiara
Verdict: A giant no

Crown Princess Victoria’s 18th Birthday Tiara looks like a teeny tiny menorah made out of whatever was at the bottom of the king’s desk drawer… some paperclips, a few tiny sapphires, some picture hanging wire and some loose melee… basic king desk drawer stuff.

Crown Princess Victoria, 18th Birthday Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, 18th Birthday Tiara

While the Cyclops Tiara isn’t as tragic as the one Madeleine’s older sister got, every time I see these tiaras, I wonder if the king and queen secretly hate their children or if perhaps they were trying to impart some kind of tiara humility.

Crown Princess Victoria's 18th Birthday Tiara Verdict: Nuh-uh

Crown Princess Victoria’s 18th Birthday Tiara
Verdict: Nuh-uh

Another privately owned tiara is the Laurel Wreath Tiara which Princess Lilian left to Crown Princess Victoria.

Crown Princess Victoria, Laurel Leaf Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, Laurel Leaf Tiara

This piece holds tremendous sentimental value to Victoria because of the strong bond she and Lilian shared.  The only person I can see Victoria loaning this to is her daughter, Estelle, when she’s older of course.  Even then, she might require her to leave a valid driver’s license and credit credit card.  Sofia would have a better chance of getting hit by lighting while holding a winning Lottery ticket in Smurf Village than wearing this piece on her wedding day.

Lilian's Laurel Leaf Tiara Privately owned by Crown Princess Victoria Verdict: No smurfing chance

Lilian’s Laurel Leaf Tiara
Privately owned by Crown Princess Victoria
Verdict: No smurfing way

Also among the tiaras with no chance at all of showing up on Sofia is the Braganza Tiara.

Queen Silvia, Braganza

Queen Silvia, the Braganza Tiara

The Braganza Tiara is reserved for queens.  And I’m not talking the awesome kind of queens who steer you away from bright pink lipstick and make you margaritas when you’re sad, a Crown Princess wore this once and when she got home, the tiara ripped off her arms and beat her unconscious with them.  Okay, that last part probably only happened in my head, but this is one big badass tiara you don’t mess with, it’s about five inches tall and no one even knows how much it weighs probably because they’re afraid to ask it.

The Braganza Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation, Reserved for the Queen Verdict: No chance

The Braganza Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation, Reserved for the Queen
Verdict: Not bloody likely

Sofia probably won’t wear the Cameo Tiara either.  Some people assume this tiara is reserved for the top slot-bound brides because both Queen Silvia and Crown Princess Victoria wore it on their wedding day, but it was also the bridal tiara of two of the king’s sisters and was even borrowed by Queen Ingrid of Denmark when she went to a costume party dressed as Queen Josephine of Sweden.

Queen Ingrid of Denmark in the borrowed Cameo Tiara

Queen Ingrid of Denmark in the borrowed Cameo Tiara

It’s a very difficult tiara to pull off but Crown Princess Victoria did it to perfection on her wedding day.

Crown Princess Victoria, The Cameo Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, The Cameo Tiara

Because the tiara is so closely associated with Crown Princess Victoria in the minds and hearts of the Swedish people, it’s unlikely Sofia would wear it as a wedding tiara.

The Cameo Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Possible but highly improbable

The Cameo Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Unlikely but possible

Despite being part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation, the Baden Fringe Tiara is another piece that’s closely associated with Crown Princess Victoria.

VictoriaBadenFringe

Crown Princess Victoria, the Baden Fringe Tiara

Queen Victoria had specified that she really wanted this to be a tiara mainly for the Crown Princess.  The tiara has made a few appearances in the past on the heads of non-Crown Princesses, but in recent years, it’s only been seen on Crown Princess Victoria.  Maybe Queen Victoria’s ghost finally came back and said something.

The Baden Fringe Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation, Intended Primarily for Crown Princess Use Verdict: Over Queen Victoria's dead ghost

The Baden Fringe Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation, Intended Primarily for Crown Princess Use
Verdict: Over Queen Victoria’s dead ghost

The tiara most closely associated with Princess Madeleine is the Modern Fringe Tiara.

Princess Madeleine, Modern Fringe Tiara

Princess Madeleine, Modern Fringe Tiara

It is privately owned, not part of the family’s foundation, and is believed to have been given to Princess Madeleine as a wedding gift by Queen Silvia who received it from King Carl Gustaf for their 10th wedding anniversary.  Princess Madeleine wore it on her wedding day and has been the only one to wear it since.

ModernFringe

The Modern Fringe Tiara
Privately owned
Verdict: Inconceivable

One of the tiaras technically up for grabs is the Napoleonic Cut Steel Tiara.

Crown Princess Victoria, Napoleonic Steel Cut Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, Napoleonic Steel Cut Tiara

Queen Silvia found it in one of the cabinets when she was rooting around the palace one day and she should have left it there.  Usually when a tiara gets shoved out of sight and no one even thinks to look for it for a century, there’s a reason.  This thing has no stones in it at all.  I am a Sparkle Purist who believes that a tiara without stones is like a swimming pool without water, Lucky Charms without the marshmallows, an optimist without hope.  One of the issues of a cut steel tiara as a wedding tiara is how it would photograph.  At a royal wedding, the tiara has to hold up under a variety of lighting conditions, these tiaras lose their impact and look like dull metal without a strong enough light source. The metal work on this one is pretty spectacular, but for a votive candle holder, not a tiara.  This tiara always makes me think of the American Thanksgiving celebration with a feather motif that looks a bit like a fanned out turkey tail, acorns scattered about and the general feeling I’m left with of unrealized expectation and relief it it doesn’t come around more frequently.

Napoleonic Cut Steel Tiara Part of Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Not bridal

Napoleonic Cut Steel Tiara
Part of Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Not bridal

The Swedish Royal Family also has a second cut steel tiara that’s so unfortunate, no one has even bothered to give it a name other than the descriptive Smaller Steel Tiara.  I call it The Bear Trap Tiara because the crisscrossed metal work looks like metal teeth.

Crown Princess Victoria, Small Steel Cut Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, Small Steel Cut Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria is the only one who even goes near this thing, according to tiara lore, she’s the one who found it being used as a door stop and decided it should be restored.  I think Victoria feels bad for tiaras no one else wants and wears them so they can fulfill their tiara destiny.  Once while swimming in Turks and Caicos, I came face to face with a six foot barracuda, it’s mouth open revealing enormous razor-sharp teeth.  Apparently, barracuda can mistake the shine from jewelry with a small fish appetizer.  Pretty sure this tiara would send a barracuda in the opposite direction.

Small Steel Cut Tiara Part of Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Dive down deep to save your head... Oooo Barracuda

Small Steel Cut Tiara
Part of Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Dive down deep to save your head… Oooo Barracuda

Despite a complicated past that involves another graphic designing prince who wound up losing his title for marrying a commoner and a deal dispute, the Edward VII Ruby Tiara is once again able to be worn as part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation.

Queen Silvia, King Edward VII Ruby Tiara

Queen Silvia, King Edward VII Ruby Tiara

It is a beautiful romantic tiara, but because of its height, it’s intended to be worn with a lot of hair piled on top of the head, otherwise it sticks up like an ornate metal fence.  Sofia’s hair has the length, in the hands of a stylist with some tiara updo experience, it could work.  Tiaras with this kind of height can be difficult to wear, though, which might be why none of the other ladies in the Swedish Royal Family have given it a go.  Queen Silvia makes wearing these pieces look effortless, but she’s a tiara warrior.

King Edward VII Ruby Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Possible

King Edward VII Ruby Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Possible

Also in the Bernadotte Family Foundation is an amethyst tiara known as Queen Josephine’s Amethyst Tiara that was a necklace until Queen Silvia had it made into a tiara.

Princess Désirée, Queen Josephine's Amethyst Tiara

Princess Désirée, Queen Josephine’s Amethyst Tiara

There aren’t a lot of amethyst tiaras out there which makes this one somewhat unique.  Amethyst was considered to be one of the most precious gemstones up until the 18th century when an abundance of amethyst mines were discovered, devaluing the gem considerably.  No longer a cardinal stone, royal families weren’t interested in gems that were suddenly affordable to the masses.  The amethysts in this piece are spectacular, however the tiara is not terribly bridal.

Princess Madeleine, Queen Josephine's Amethyst Tiara

Princess Madeleine, Queen Josephine’s Amethyst Tiara

Perhaps it would be a more understandable choice if Sofia had been born in February, but her birthstone as a December baby is turquoise or blue topaz.

Queen Josephine's Amethyst Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Better on a wedding guest

Queen Josephine’s Amethyst Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Better on a wedding guest

The Nine Prong Tiara is also shared by the ladies of the Swedish Royal Family and it’s a dazzler but its size and construction make it not an advisable choice for those still in tiara training-wheels.

Queen Silvia, Nine Prong Tiara

Queen Silvia, Nine Prong Tiara

This tiara is not attached to a head, a head is attached to it, the frame is so rigid, it can be quite the skull crusher.  Queen Silvia, the tiara’s primary wearer, appears to have no problems with the Nine Prong Tiara, but the younger generation hasn’t even attempted it.  Its sunburst design might appeal to Sofia who has a sun tattooed on her back, but it might not fit her.  Sofia’s model card has her 165cm (5’4”) while Queen Silvia is 170cm (5’7”).

Engagement Announcement

Engagement Announcement

Queen Silvia’s head appears to have a significantly larger circumference which means on Sofia the tiara would fall lower which is where the tiara’s vice grip effect takes hold.

The Nine Prong Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Possible & potentially painful

The Nine Prong Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Possible & potentially painful

While the Nine Prong Tiara is surprisingly rigid, the Leuchtenberg Tiara can accommodate a wide arrange of craniums due to its construction of eleven separate pieces.

Queen Silvia, Leuchtenberg Tiara

Queen Silvia, Leuchtenberg Tiara

It’s believed the tiara came with a set of pearls that could be switched out for the sapphires, but the pearls at some point left the set, their existence and what exactly happened to them is a contested matter.

Queen Josephine, Leuchtenberg Tiara with pearls

Queen Josephine, Leuchtenberg Tiara with pearls

The sapphires are detachable and could always be swapped out with new pearls or different gems in the future.  The Leuchtenberg Tiara is a very grand piece and is one of Queen Silvia’s favorites.  It hasn’t been seen on anyone else in nearly four decades and while theoretically it could be borrowed, it would be highly unlikely.  Queens don’t loan out their favorite bling, especially to non-royal brides who are still commoners when they walk into the church.  It would have been like Kate Middleton getting married in the Girls of Great Britain and Ireland Tiara, it just wasn’t going to happen.

Leuchtenberg Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Trust Verdict: Theoretically possible but highly unlikely

Leuchtenberg Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Trust
Verdict: Theoretically possible but highly unlikely

While steeped in history, the Four Button Tiara and the Six Button Tiaras are widely considered to be the collection’s most disappointing pieces.  Because of the simple metal frame, the Four Button Tiara is often compared to Jeep lights.

Crown Princess Victoria, Four Button Tiara

Crown Princess Victoria, Four Button Tiara

The buttons are believed to be from King Carl XIV Johan’s gala uniform, with the buttons of the Six Button Tiara incorporated into his coronation crown.  The Six Button Tiara has two rows of diamonds added at the base but is only slightly less ridiculous.

Crown Princess VIctoria, Six Button Tiara

Crown Princess VIctoria, Six Button Tiara

It’s very possible one of these two tiaras could show up on Sofia.  A bridal veil might help with the tiaras looking like floating cookies suspended in space by tiara poltergeists.

Button Tiaras Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Possible

Button Tiaras
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Possible

The most bridal of all of the Swedish Royal Family’s tiaras is the Connaught Tiara and there are no restrictions on who wears it.  It’s already been worn by two brides: Princess Sibylla  and Princess Christina.

Princess Sibylla, The Connaught Tiara

Princess Sibylla, The Connaught Tiara

The construction of five detachable diamond drops hanging from forget-me-knot loops ups the degree of difficulty wearing it somewhat because of its higher center of gravity.

If Sofia borrows a tiara, I think it will be the Connaught Tiara.

The Connaught Tiara Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation Verdict: Most likely

The Connaught Tiara
Part of the Bernadotte Family Foundation
Verdict: Most likely

Swedish princesses don’t limit themselves to just traditional tiaras, though.

Crown Princess Victoria, Diamond Necklace Bandeau

Crown Princess Victoria, Diamond Necklace Bandeau

There is the not-quite-a-tiara Swedish Diamond Bandeau believed to be two separate diamond necklaces as well as an assortment of brooches, diamond rivieres, and hair pins incorporated into their updos.

Crown Princess Victoria, Diamond Arrow Brooch

Crown Princess Victoria, Diamond Arrow Brooch

While I am a huge fan of tiaras, my absolute favorite piece from the royal collection is the Bernadotte Rose Brooch.

Princess Madeleine, Bernadotte Rose Brooch

Princess Madeleine, Bernadotte Rose Brooch

This piece has the potential to be breathtaking with a veil.  When Princess Charlene opted to go tiara-less on her wedding day, the result was spectacular and memorable.

Princess Charlene of Monaco

Princess Charlene of Monaco

The Bernadotte Rose Brooch is smaller than the piece Charlene borrowed from Princess Caroline, but given the 6″ height difference between brides, the Bernadotte Rose Brooch would probably be the perfect scale for Sofia, impactful but not overwhelming.

Surprisingly, in a collection wrought with history, not a lot is known about this stunner, making it the perfect piece for Sofia to make her own.

Bernadotte Rose Brooch Verdict: Perfection

Bernadotte Rose Brooch
Verdict: Perfection

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